Subject of the Month~ June 2017~ Rasa – All the Tastes of Life

“And so I fall in love just a little, oh a little bit, every day with someone new” ~ Hozier

madhurya-raga-anjana-das

A friend recently asked if I had heard this song by Hozier and quoted the lyric. I hadn’t but the lyric caught my interest. I began to wonder if in my travels each day, it were possible to make that level of connection to a person I did not know, to “fall in love a little bit”. Without differing my approach due to who they appeared to be, if I were relaxed and open, smiled, said hello, met their eyes and moved along, would it be possible to have a shared moment of truly seeing each other? After all, isn’t that what falling in love is?

I’m generally a friendly person, yet this consistent approach to truly meet another through a greeting dramatically opened my eyes to how we set the mood for many interactions, even very casual ones, simply by the care taken (or not taken) to be genuinely present in the moment of connection. I will leave it to you to experience the different feeling tone that arises when moving through the world like this if you choose to give it a try. It’s a very different taste of life, or rasa, I can assure you.

Rasa (rah-sa) is a Sanskrit word that carries the essential emotional characteristic of an experience as a mental state. It translates imprecisely as juice, sap, or fluid but perhaps can be better understood as the taste, mood or atmosphere. It is perhaps best described as the all-encompassing felt experience of an interaction. It is traditionally applied in Indian art, literature, music or any creative dynamic between subject and object to evoke mood. It can also be applied to a person’s relationship with an aspect of themselves or the world around them that is deeply influenced by an emotional response.

Each Sanskrit letter of the alphabet has a unique rasa, which in different combinations form unique vibrational matrices of consciousness (liberated emotions) in the space they are recited. To simplify however, we can consider the eight rasas that are outlined in the Natyasastra by Bharata Muna: love/eros, humor/joy, disgust/pity, fury/anger, compassion/sadness, heroism/bravery, terrifying/fearful, marvelous/awe-inspiring.

The ground of our exploration is how we feel when consumed by one of these rasas in a creative interaction. Rasas are not just suggested or contrived, they are literally formed in the space of the body/mind by the experience so that the “one who experiences” is immersed to the point that analysis and judgement dissolves and pure experience engulfs. Where at this point does the rasa begin and the experiencer end? Can we learn to deeply feel the intensity of emotions in an orchestrated creative space so that we can better hold it in a personal interaction? What do we need to drop so we can fully experience the essence of a life experience, a true connection, even for a moment?

Traditional Indian music, poetry and dance are specifically designed to connect the participant to one or more rasas through precise vibration, rhythm and subtleties of language. Similarly, we often use elements of music, language, literature, mantra and skillful sequencing in a yoga class to create a specific mood or theme so that instead of thinking about it, we are immersed in the wholeness of it. This is what allows us to be fluid, responsive and open in the physical and energetic body during class. This is also why we often feel good, and sometimes we cry, during or after class. It is in the non-thinking mind that the experience arises, and the rasa holds our attention here in the experience so we can more fully feel it, not separate from it.

Some achingly beautiful examples that convey rasas exquisitely are the stringed instruments in ragas and much classical music, poets of the Sufi tradition, Pablo Neruda, and many vibrationally precise kirtan recordings of Krishna Das and Jai Uttal. There are many, many more examples of art, music and experience that don’t merely touch the heart, but encourage and even dare it to expand to its fullness and beyond. If we allow our hearts to remain just a little bit more open each time this happens, maybe we can fall just a little bit more in love each day.

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